2 April 2011

Weekly Geeks 2011-12: best books so far in 2011: crime fiction

This week's Weekly Geeks task asks us to celebrate the arrival of spring (well autumn, here downunder) by looking back on the first quarter of 2011 in books, as well as our anticipation for the beginning of the second quarter of the year.

My reading is going remarkable well. I've read 49 books so far and if I keep going this well, I'm hoping to hit 200 by the end of the year.

At the beginning of 2011 I reorganised my blog and created a number of pages accessible from the header of each page.
The pages make it easy to see what my top reads have been, even though it means that as I add a review, I have to be careful to add it to each of the relevant pages.

My top crime fiction reads so far for 2011 have been

5.0, BURY YOUR DEAD, Louise Penny
5.0, THE RULE BOOK, Rob Kitchin
4.9, THE BRUTAL TELLING, Louise Penny
4.9, BAD INTENTIONS, Karin Fossum
4.8, CROOKED LETTER, CROOKED LETTER, Tom Franklin
4.8, BOUND, Vanda Symon
4.8, THE SWEETNESS AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PIE, Alan Bradley
4.7, DYING GASP, Leighton Gage 
4.7, PRIME CUT, Alan Carter 
4.7, WYATT, Garry Disher 
4.7, THE MAN WHO WENT UP IN SMOKE, Maj Sjowall & Per Wahloo
4.7, WHERE MEMORIES LIE, Deborah Crombie
4.6, STARTED EARLY, TOOK MY DOG, Kate Atkinson 
4.6, THREE SECONDS, Roslund & Hellstrom
4.6, SARAH'S KEY, Tatiana de Rosnay
4.6, THE JANUS STONE, Elly Griffiths

4 comments:

Margot Kinberg said...

Kerrie - I'm glad you've been enjoying the Louise Penny series as much as you have. I like that one very much, too :-).

kathy d. said...

Wonderful list. I've read two of these, but have put many on library reserve.

Just read Jo Nesbo's "Nemesis," and it was quite a read, an adventure, a page-turner, a roller coaster ride.

Uriah Robinson said...

Kerrie, we usually agree about what we have both read for example excellent books like The Rule Book, Dying Gasp, Bad Intentions, and Three Seconds. But I am afraid I was not impressed by The Brutal Telling, and one of my reasons was the overuse of the f-word and its derivatives in a book that was allegedly a cosy.

Kerrie said...

Norman, I must confess that language was really only on the periphery of my appreciation of this story. I thought it was in character in the way it was used

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